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EMF Detector

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Contents

Use cases

  • Measure the EMF of cellphones

History

while browsing arduino videos on youtube I came across this video(downloadable with youtube-dl(or viewable with gnash) if you don't have flash):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1Bke3750WE

I wanted to do the same with my bug device because:

  • it seemed easy
  • I am a beginner in electronics

More informations are available here:

Introduction

Bil of materials

Breadboard version

  • a 10M potentiometer
  • some good and solid copper wires
  • some connectors for the von hippel(they would need to be soldered some of the copper wires)
  • an optional (but highly recommended) serial port interface on a computer,such as an usb to serial adapter and a serial connector
  • a breadboard
  • a straw

Pictures

This is the breadboard version,Note that this image is a high resolution image so you can zoom a lot
This is the breadboard version,Note that this image is a high resolution image so you can zoom a lot
An example of approaching very close an htcdream,but without touching the antenna
An example of approaching very close an htcdream,but without touching the antenna
Top of the PCB version
Top of the PCB version
Rear of The PCB version
Rear of The PCB version
The PCB
The PCB

Circuit

The explanation of the pcb
The explanation of the pcb
How to solder the potentiometer
How to solder the potentiometer

In order to wire the potentiometer I followed this guide

Mode of Operation

  • The potentiometer needs to be adjusted to be a bit more than at the minimum
  • Insert The von hippel module to slot 0
How to connect the circuit to the Von Hippel module
How to connect the circuit to the Von Hippel module
How to connect the Von Hippel module to serial
How to connect the Von Hippel module to serial

Applications(software)

  • The application running on the bug device was posted here,it's based on vonHippelAnalogDemo
  • Here's the application running on a computer
#/usr/bin/env python
#This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
#it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
#the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
#(at your option) any later version.
#
#This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
#but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
#MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
#GNU General Public License for more details.
#
#You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
#along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>
import serial
import pexpect

gp = pexpect.spawn("gnuplot")
gp.sendline("set xrange [] ")
gp.sendline("set yrange [] ") 
gp.sendline("unset key") 

ser = serial.Serial()
ser.baudrate = 115200
ser.port = "/dev/ttyUSB0"
ser.open()

file = open('/tmp/gnuplot', 'w')
i = 0 
while True:
    mesure = ser.readline().split()[1]
    file.write(str(i) + " " +  mesure + "\n")
    file.flush()
    print mesure
    gp.sendline('plot "/tmp/gnuplot"')
    i += 1
ser.close()

Not using pygnuplot speeded the application a lot(from unusable to low cpu usage) On a debian,ubuntu or derivated distribution do:

sudo apt-get install python-serial python-pexpect gnuplot

in order to install the required python modules,and of course gnuplot

TODO

  • cross compile python-pexpect and gnuplot for the 1.4.3 rootfs

Thanks

Thanks to all the people that helped me to realize this "electronic circuit" (I'm a beginner in electronics)